Dive Type: 
Wreck
Max Depth: 
35m
Entry Type: 
Shore Entry
Certification: 
AOWD

The Tug Boat Rozi was originally a Bristol built tugboat, launched in 1958 as “The Rossmore” by Charles Hill & Sons, a major shipbuilder at that time. In 1969 she was sold to Rea Towing company and reamed Rossgarth. In 1972 she was sold to Mifsud Brothers (Malta Ship Towage) Ltd, Malta, retaining her name. In the same year she sailed from Liverpool for Malta where in 1973 she was registered. In 1981 she was sold to Tug Malta and renamed Rozi, which is a very traditional Maltese name.

Tug Boat Rozi was finally scuttled in 1992 off Cirkewwa after 20 years working in the Grand Harbour. It was intended as a submarine attraction for Captain Morgan’s Safari Tours. These tours no longer operate, and the wreck of Rozi is purely left for divers. She is fully intact, except engine and propellers, with it’s mast starting at 18 meters and most of the wreck between 25 and 34 meters.

How to do the wreck dive

Traditionally we, local dive centers, take most of our escorted divers on this wreck dive. Tug Boat Rozi is located on the North West coast of Malta, at the back of the ferry terminal of Cirkewwa. You begin the dive from northern most entry point in Cirkewwa, which requires a giant stride entry. After descent to around 5 meters you follow the shallow reef for a couple of minutes until you reach a drop off which takes you down to a second reef at 15 meters. Following this reef for around 8-12 minutes with the drop off on your left shoulder and you will eventually see a large flat boulder below you at about 20-25 meters. Turn to your left and head out into the deeper water maintaining a depth of 10-15 meters. If the underwater visibility is good you will be able to see the wreck from a distance.

It is very common to meet amberjacks and bonito in this area, which ‘buzz’ the shoals of small fish.

Tug Boat Rozi sits upright on a sandy bottom of 35 meters, bow facing west with all areas accessible. Some penetration is possible through the empty engine room, the wheel house and behind the wheelhouse, where you can dive into several doorways and explore different rooms. But be careful with the sharp rusting metal parts especially on the ship railings. Overall, there is plenty of time to discover the wreck. And a thorough exploration of it can be done before entering any decompression.

Combine this dive site with statue of the Madonna, which is sheltered in a small crevice in only 18m of water.

If you generally consume a lot of air, remember to head back towards the shallow reef and an exit point at 100 bar. When you are good with air you can leave the wreck and dive along a wall which passes a large anchor on your way back. We did not have time for it, but if you want it is possible to combine this dive site with statue of the Madonna, which is sheltered in a small crevice in only 18m of water. Following the Madonna or dive along the reef you should return to Susie Pool where you can complete your safety stop or decompression if required and make an easy exit at the ramp where railings and steps have been provided by Malta tourism authority.

Marine life & dive highlights

The wreck has been colonized by marine life and is surrounded by shoals of fish. We have spotted 2 resident moray eels, living in the wholes & pipes of the wreck, an octopus, barracudas cruising past in the current, numerous silver breams, red and yellow parrot fish, giant groupers, dentex and the occasional nudibranch (vividly colored sea slugs). There were also a number of scorpion fish camouflaged and hiding on the deck. Besides that, it is very common to meet amberjacks and bonito in this area, which ‘buzz’ the shoals of small fish. The flat sandy seabed around the wreck is covered in huge anemones.